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is exported all around the world. they want the u.s. economy to be stronger as quickly as possible, because it means there will be able to continue to export. as much as they're trying to move from an export driven economy to a more domestic consumption based economy, they will still rely heavily on exports. the more americans are working, the more money they have in their pockets, the more they will be shopping in stores, and so much of what they buy is made from many other countries, including china. the healthier the u.s. economy is, the more that china will export. that means jobs for the chinese people. >> when you talk to leaders, how much are they actually were it about united states? -- worried about united states? >> i think united states is incredibly important to china, and recognize that. not only in very practical ways, but in another way, more psychological. there is a 150 year history were china has been trying to check itself up in big shin itself upr status. there is this lingering psychological mindset of china being victimized by the great powers. it is kind of a struggle
people in the u.s. and caused billions of dollars of damage. unless you live in one of the affected areas you probably think things are back to norm. but that's because the media is barely cleaning up the cleanup efforts. in new york city, they're living in third world conditions, raw sewage continues to flow into water ways. thousands still have no power and direct subway service is not expected to return into the middle of next year. >> we were up to five feet of water. it was not water but it was all cesspool so it was sewage water. >> how much can a body tank. >> blankets, two socks three sweaters and gloves. >> they have got garbage they're cleaning in other areas and putting it on the beach here, yet we have still have garbage here. >> it's the way life is. >> jennifer: thousands of volunteers have flocked to the rockaways to help with the cleanup efforts tonight coming from new york, dr. sabaya, welcome to the war room. >> i'm having difficulty hearing you. >> jennifer: i can hear you, just a little bit faint. >> a little bit faint. hopefully they can turn up your microphone becaus
hospitalized since early december. senator inouye who served in the u.s. house in 1959 before being elected to the senate in 1962 was serving his ninth term in office after winning their reelection in 2010 was 75% of the vote. a winner of the distinguished service cross for heroism, senator inouye lost his right arm in combat during world war ii. he later received a medal of honor along with another number of japanese american soldiers. from bill clinton in 2000. here is a conversation with the senator from 2008. >>> welcome to the latest interview in the united states capitol historical society's series of oral history interviews to the economy former member of congress from connecticut and i am the president of the united states capitol and historical society. this interview with senator daniel inouye is part of a special series featuring asian-pacific members of congress. in these interviews current and fellow members have relived their memories of people, places and events that have shaped their public career. it is our hope that these recollections will provide listeners with a deeper
legislation he's sponsoring which will allow more highly skilled immigrants the u.s. that's live at 7:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> i think riders institute is something that's important within the culture. we are a culture of words of voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page of writing but i think that there is no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps film. but there is something in literature that cap chures the hunal spirit. >> this weekend join book tv as we look tpwhind scenes at the literary life of new york's capital city albany. >> senators from new york and new jersey say hurricane sandy caused $5 billion worth of damage to rail subway and port infrastructure in their state. they testified on surface transportation yesterday. >> i call this hearing to order. thank you for joining us, mr. secretary. i asked you to testify today because i'm deeply concerned about the recent report that the f.h.a. could potentially need taxpayer support for the first time in its 78-year histo
enough time discussing ways to help them assimilate into civilian life. as the son of a u.s. air force veteran who spent 31 years in the air force, i'm acutely aware, as coul kay is, that it t just those that wear the uniform that serve, but their families as well. many returning vets and their families encounter a whole range of social and economic hardships that can be hard to overcome. most notably, the unemployment rate among our returning vets from afghanistan and iraq is significantly higher than for the general population, something i know kay has worked on extensively. she's also worked to get our veterans the medical assistance, the job training and the financial support they need. indeed, i don't know of any senator that's done more to help america's heroes adjust to life after the military. that's just one of the reasons why she will be sorely missed. here's another reason, though: kay has fought time and time again to promote tax relief for hardworking texas families. in thehooin the mid-1990's, shed create the so-called homemaker ira to make sure that stay-at-home moms and
accountable. >> this warning here after a u.s. official tells cnn that syria has begun mixing chemicals that could be used to make the deadly gas sarin. bob bear, i'll bring you in, cnn contributor, former cia officer. welcome back. before we talk about the specifics of sarin, let me just throw this at you. is it possible at all that this man, this mad man, bashar al assad, is bluffing? >> oh, i don't think he's bluffing. we have to consider what he represents and that's a very small community, which feels under threat. it thinks it will be destroyed by sunni fundamentalists if it loses damascus or any other big cities. they have their backs to the wall. they say among themselves that when it comes to their lives or killing the rebels they will kill the rebels. in other words, yes, they will use the sarin, i've been dealing with the people for 30 years, they're almost a cult. what seems to us completely irrational decision, they're capable of. i don't know whether they have reached this point or not, but if things get bad enough in syria, i have no dowd they'll use it. >> on this sarin
of pennsylvania. his research includes the u.s. economy, tax policy, and the stock market. he is previously a senior economist at the board of governors at the federal reserve system. he went to that graduate school of business at columbia university. he has worked for both the george w. bush and clinton administrations. both of you went to the same university. i'm sure you can agree on everything today. dr. zandi first. >> thank you for the opportunity. it is an honor to be here with kevin, a good friend of mine. let me say that these are my own personal views. lawmakers have to resolve three issues -- first, the fiscal cliff. second, raising the treasury debt ceiling, which as you know is becoming an issue rarely soon. third, achieving long-term fiscal sustainability. that is deficit reduction and tax increases and spending cuts that allow the gdp ratio to stabilize by the end of the decade. these three things need to be done now. in terms of the fiscal cliff, if policy is unchanged and we go over the cliff and there is still no change after that, the gdp in 2013 will 3.5 percentage point
to represent the nation's second largest state in the u.s. senate. kay came to washington ready to work. she established herself early on as a leader on transportation and nasa and as a fighter for lower taxes and smaller, smarter government. kay won a claim as an advocate for science and competitiveness, helped secure bipartisan support for the landmark america competes act, and she became known throughout the state for the close attention she paid to constituents. shortly after her election to the senate, kay began a tradition imitated by many others since of holding weekly constituent meetings over coffee whenever the senate's in session. the groups usually ranged in size from 100-150, and at any given coffee, you might come across families in bermuda shorts, bankers in pinstripes or college football players. over the years, kay has hosted about 50,000 people in her office through these coffees, but her attention to constituent service goes well beyond that. back home, she is one of the few politicians in texas who has actually visited all 254 counties, some of which are home to more catt
is most important families in the u.s. and also from a person that works and education. and i have to say that this is but a microcosm of a whole nation that is speaking out and saying the congress needs to govern. solve this problem. senator harkin is corrected they created a problem and they can solve the problem let's get the house back to work and get a vote on a very reasonable way forward and let's make sure the middle class, the working poor, and all of the people in the nation 100 percent are cared for in the solution. that's the way forward for we the people, and i thank you very much for coming out today. let us continue our efforts to make sure that we the people can have our well expressed in a congressional decision that in this this foolishness and governs. thank you very much. [applause] >> the so-called fiscal plan that would result in tax increases and spending cuts taking effect new year's day which is tuesday. the newspaper reports that negotiations have shifted to the senate. according to the helpless senate republicans may accept a plan that extends tax cuts for incom
this year, when the state of florida sued the u.s. government for court determination of the preclearance under the voting rights act of 1965, preclearance of five counties, for discrimination, and further, sued the u.s. government by questioning the constitutionality of the 1965 voting rights act. in the discovery for that case, the testimony was taken of this former general counsel of the florida republican party. and what i would like you to know is this key individual who, with your permission, with the committee's permission i'd like to insert those documents in the record -- that his testimony, given in april, mr. mitchell said, and it's in the sworn testimony, that he was asked to draft the original version of the legislation that became the law. he was asked to drafted by republican party leaders, specifically after consultations with andy palmer, then the executive director of the florida gop, frank, head of the gop state house campaigns, and joel springer, head of the state senate, republican campaigns. and in early talks with executive director of the florida gop. and with this
. discretionary turns out to be the easier nut to crack because that money doesn't go out the door unless this u.s. house of representatives acts. that distinguishes it, mr. speaker, from mandatory spending. that's the third set of columns on my chart. mandatory spending, as i said, 2/3 of our budget, 68.3% to be precise, and of all the sequestration cuts, 63.8% of the budget is only going to bear 14.4% of the pain. the back story there, mr. speaker, is that's the only 14.4% of the pain. as i said discretionary spending has been on the chopping block in 2011, 2012, and now again in 2013. but mandatory spending we haven't had a single agreement about, and i don't hear the white house talking about it, either. the white house put together a group it was called the simpson-bowles commission. it was named afterers kin bowles, a former clinton chief of staff, and alan simpson, former republican senator. and they came together and what the president called his deficit reduction commission to give the president and -- an idea what we could do to get our fiscal house in order. i want to show in you this c
, lack of a better term, triball rivalries or the u.s. cooperation creates resentment among another group. they want to develop their neighbors, but not lackees of the americans. there's insight into the impact hispanic candidate -- impact that history's had. they are used to conquerors coming and going so they create a relationship in how they hedge their bets. apart from the human tragedies, your heart breaks reading about someone who had a baby, spoke to his wife before he went on the mission, and then died in a helicopter crash. your heart breaks on the human realm reminding you of the cost. it reminds you the low gist tick -- logistical challenges. >> did it make you regret our approach in afghanistan? >> no. i think it reminds us of the challenges of it. at the end of theday, afghanistan is important and important for multiple reasons. we don't want a safe haven in afghanistan for people to come back and reconstitute the safe taifn. to have an unstable afghanistan where radical islamists are organized is a danger to pakistan and its nuclear capabilities. they are concerned about tha
. there are variables that will affect that that we cannot control. with the u.s. does and the international financial institutions do is going to matter. morsi cares about with the international community to cares about him. they are sensitive to that because they need outside support to get their economy back on track so there is a point of leverage. if we can use that i might be more optimistic. but in terms of a long-term goal is, it is islam for a reason and they're going to become liberals. all this talk about post islam is unrealistic because we are talking about deeply religious conservative societies where large majorities maybe they don't vote on the basis of sharia but they are sympathetic to public life and they can empower those elements of society to would push them further to the right and that isn't just egypt we see that in other countries where the democracy doesn't always have a moderating effect and they don't have a more islamic egypt and this could be somewhat liberal if not the liberal. >> thank you very much. thank you. this is a fascinating discussion and i appreciate your won
. they are professionals and patriots. they serve in places where there is little or no u.s. presence. i trust them with my life. it is important to recognize that our colleagues and across the department at home and abroad get it right list times for years on end on some of the top the circumstances imaginable. he cannot lose sight of that. -- we cannot lose sight of that. we have to do better. be open to our colleagues who lost their lives in benghazi. -- we owe it to our colleagues who lost their lives in benghazi. thousands of our colleagues are serving america in diplomatic posts around the world. we will never forget every act of terrorism and we'll never stop working to make things better and safer. the united states will keep leading and engaging around the world, including in those hard places where america's interests -- thank you very much. >> mr. chairman, senator lugar, members of the committee, i also want to thank you for this opportunity. all of us have a responsibility to provide the men and women who have served this country with the best possible security and support. the supervisors hav
of the president's permanent campaign and he's an associate political science professor at the u.s. naval academy and is here to talk about presidents and their campaigning and fundraising. welcome to the program. guest: thank you very much for having me. host: how has the campaigning and the fund raising change or altered the job of the president? guest: what i do in my research is i focus on the president's time. most look at money raised but time is the president's scarcest resource and over the last three and a half decades, the president has spent more and more time raising money and they've -- there are always more important things that the president can do than he has time to do. so more time fundraising means less time doing other things. host: who makes the decision on how much time the president is going to do the fund raising? somebody in the white house or there are people in the parties? caller: it's a combination of white house staff who are dedicated to thinking about elect trarl matters and outside staff. in guest: the decades ago, it was outsourced to the committee but ever since
and innovation can benefit the u.s. economy. speakers include white house national economic counsellor sperling and former congresswoman and burned mobile vice-president susan molinari. it starts 10:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. also tomorrow, a look at how u.s. debt, slow economic growth and the retirement of baby boomers could impact the global and economic future of the united states. from the american enterprise institute doug join us live at 5:30 p.m. eastern also here on c-span. >> we are at the new york state museum. this is our galley that is dedicated to the history of september 11 and the attacks at the world trade center. we decided with the gallery to tell the story for the first moments of the attacks using objects from the world trade center site. this is a piece of steel from the south tower. we put it in a place where the public can and should come and touch it. it gives it a real tangible experience. this is a piece of steel from the north towers. this is a dramatically bent piece of steel. this is within 10 floors of the impact of 9/11 on the north tower. again, you can see
and exploration, nasa is more than just a science agency, it is an exploration agency, a tool of u.s. farm policy. just looking at sites as defined in the service, it is realistic for. the reason why you do human in part is for exploring the unknown, but putting people in an unusual or alien situation. you learn things you would not learn if he stayed at home. there is a wonderful example looking at someone -- and viruses and how they become changed in space. this means there is a gene sequencing issue. if we can figure out how to control but, we could have a potential vaccine for salmonella. that is not the thing that would emerge into a ground based laboratory. it emerges might put people in a very different environment to go into the unknown. human space flight is probably the most interdisciplinary scientific and technical activity this country can engage in. much broader than biotech and any other fields. you have all fields come together to pull off a successful mission. it is incredibly hard. i would say as part of your portfolio of activities, that humans have to be part of it. they do re
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17